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In 1922 three men, all expert glass blowers, opened one of the most successful independant lamp plants in the country. The only lamp company found associated with any of these men was the Brite Lite Lamp Mfg. Co., Inc. President, George Coby; secretary and treasurer, Ely Egnatoff; sales manager, A Ullman This in the year 1921 not 1922. The plant was at 214 Oxford St, Providence, RI.10

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Acts and Resolves
Passed by
The General Assembly
of
The State of Rhode Island
and
Providence Plantations January 1920

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Electrical Merchandising Week
Volumes 25-26
1921
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Hardware World Plumbing & Heating
Volume 16
1921
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Hardware World Plumbing & Heating
Volume 16
1921


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Providence Daily Journal
September 6, 1919
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Providence Daily Journal
September 16, 1919
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Providence Daily Journal
September 17, 1919
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Providence Daily Journal
September 18, 1919
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Providence Daily Journal
September 19, 1919
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Fram Light and Power Yearbook
1922
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Providence Journal
August 28, 1923
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Providence Journal
April 1, 1924


In 1923 Brite Lite Lamp had to defended themselves for patent infringement by General Electric. They were unsuccessful.


The Electric Lamp Industry
By Arthur A Bright Jr, 1949



The Federal Reporter September-October, 1923


With prosperity, both General Electric and Westinghouse became interested in the businees. Eventually General Electric bought the business. George Coby, Ely Egnatoff and Willian Cepek next ventured into the Radio Tube Business and founded the first indepenant radio tube company in this part of the country. 5

In 1928 the executive officers of the Triad Tube Company of Pawtucker, RI were George Coby, president, Ely Egnatoff (one of the principals of the CeCo tube company), treasurer, Harry Steinle, vice-president and general manager, and Willian Cepek (another principal of the CeCo tube company), secretary. At that time they were the largest indepentant tube factory in the Country.

The engineering staff included S U Marie, PHD, Roger Williams, PHD, A S Friedman, BS, and Gregory Ryisky, EE ME, in addition to graduates of the foremost technical and engineering schools in the country. 2

The connection with CeCo tubes comes from an agreement that Egnatoff and Cepek, made when they sold the company, to not manufacture tubes for one year. So, they moved across the river to Pawtucket and manufactured Triad Pens, which were triangular pens that wouldn't roll off the table. Apparently, the lure of radio tubes was too much because in June 1929, Triad announced their new line of radio tubes in a distinctive triangular box. Immediately successful, $1,000,000 in sales was reached in the first year. 3

Providence Journal
February 2nd, 1929

Radio Retailing May 1929

In 1930 Triad made a deal with RCA to build tubes under their present and future patents. 8




Radio Doings February 22, 1930


In 1930 production was on the increase in the new Triad plant in Pawtucket, RI. According to president George Coby more than 600 people were on the payroll. The factory has increased floor space and mechanical facilities. Reactions at Radio trade shows in New York, Chicago, Boston and Philadelphia have proved to be highly encouraging. 4

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Radio, August 1930

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Providence Journal
April 17, 1932

TRIAD METAL SHEILDED RADIO TUBES
Article from "Tube Collector" published by Tube Collector Association


SERIES MG
TECHNICAL BULLETIN
TRIAD MANUFACTURING CO., INC. - PAWTUCKET, R. I. - U.S.A.

This comes from the RMA registration notice on Triad's line of metal-glass tubes, on Release 34 in July 1935. It came out a month or so after others brought out glass contenders versus GE's and RCA's "original nine" metal types. It covers the nine, plus the orphaned 6D5. It cleverly aids the construction of AC-DC series-string sets by adding the 25Z5 MG rectifier and 43 MG output tube. There are also two plug-in ballast lamps to replace "curtain burner" resistance cords or other resistors . . giving what looked like an extra tube in the radio. - Ed.


Triad Manufacturing Company is pleased to announce a new line of tubes known as the MG series. Consistent with its established reputation for progress and individuality, Triad has produced a non-breakable, fully shielded, metal tube in which a newly developed glass is used for maintaining the vacuum. By this method the same vast experience accumulated in several decades of lamp and radio tube manufacture, is not suddenly upset and consequently, the Triad series MG will have the same long and serviceable life that has characterized properly made glass sealed tubes in the past.

Certain highly publicized so-called metal tubes now available, consist of a series of glass to metal seals in addition to several metal to metal welds. By this construction, the overall height of certain tubes is reduced but it is the contention of the Triad Engineers that the series MG described herein offers the same technical advantages, a greater sales appeal, and less inherent risk to the manufacturer adopting these types.

It should be further noted, that the Triad series MG is not a line of tubes for some indefinite date in the future. Equipment has been installed during the past several months to produce 10,000 of these tubes per day for immediate delivery to manufacturers adopting the Triad line. This new line of tubes has the further advantage of being designed such that it is fully interchangeable with the existing metal tubes. The new standard octal bases are used throughout and base wiring is in accordance with the standards of the Industry.

As a further advantage, the manufacturer is offered four additional types for AC-DC uses. These types have the same characteristics as the corresponding glass types, but they have been re-designed to conform with the metal tube series.

The rating and basing arrangements of the MG series will be found elsewhere in this bulletin. A brief description of the MG types may be of help in becoming familiar with the new type numbers.

5Z4 The 5Z4 is a cathode type, full wave rectifier having low voltage drop for general use. It has approximately half the voltage drop of the corresponding glass type 80. Heater and cathode are tied together internally.

6A8 This tube is essentially the same as the type 6A7, except for the additional pin tied to the external metal shell. 6C5 This tube is a triode detector-amplifier very similar in characteristics to the familiar 6C6 when the latter is connected as a triode.

6D5 The 6D5 is a power amplifier triode. Its characteristics are quite similar to the type 42 when the latter is connected as a triode.

6F5 This high-mu triode is practically the same, so far as electrical characteristics are concerned, as the triode section of the familiar type 75. The grid connection is brought out through the top cap.

6F6 The metal type 6F6 is electrically similar in all respects to the type 42 when employed as a pentode power amplifier.

6H6 This double diode is designed to provide for AVC and diode detection. It is similar in every respect to the double diode section found on multipurpose glass tubes except that both cathodes are brought out separately.

6J7 This hi-mu pentode detector amplifier is similar electrically to the type 77.

6K7 The 6K7 is a triple grid variable mu amplifier similar to the well-known type 78.

25Z5 MG This special type is provided to fill the need of a rectifier for AC-DC sets and is similar electrically to the type 25Z5.

43 MG This type has characteristics identical to the 43 and provides a power output tube to complete the AC-DC line.

50A2 MG This is a ballast tube in a metal shell with a tap to supply two #40 pilot lights in series.

50B2 MG The 50B2 MG is designed for the same service as the 50A2 MG but tapped to supply a single #40 pilot lamp. Both ballast tubes have an overall voltage drop of 50 volts and are employed in transformerless receivers for AC-DC voltage. For example a 25Z5 MG rectifier, a 43 MG power output tube, a 6K7 R.F. amplifier and a 6J7 detector comprise a typical compliment [sic] for ballast tube operation.

This listing of metal shielded tubes should not be considered complete, but simply the list of types which are now in production. Considerable experimental work is being done on various types of metal shielded tubes at Triad. When this experimental work indicates that additions or changes should be made to our production types, improvements will be incorporated.

With the innovation of the new series MG tubes, it is assured that most of the basic and essential experience gained from glass tube processing will be incorporated in the making of the new metal glass tubes. These facts cannot be over look [sic] so readily, in view of the widespread use and acceptance of the glass tubes. Combining this knowledge with the new principle of metal tube design, a most permanent and useful series of radio tubes has been developed.



About the same time, Arcturus put out its "Coronet" series (covered in TC, August 2016 and April 2017), a similar glass-in-metal line with adapters to "modernize" existing radios. (The radio manufacturers don't seem to have bought this series.)

Triad added a few MG types, like the 6N5MG and 6Q7MG. A few radios were all-MG. The Silvertone models 1909, 1912, and 1962 sported a 6A8MG, 6K7MG, 6Q7MG, 6C5MG, push-pull 6F6MGs, and a 5Z4MG. Hytron also sold some MGs like the 6J7MG and 6K7MG, possibly made by Triad. So did KenRad (a 6A8) and National Union (a 6Q7MG)

However, when Triad brought out its "Triadyne" group of output tubes (dual triodes with a cathode follower vigorously driving the output side) in 1935-37, they were glass types. These were the 6B5, 6AB6, 6AC5G, 6AC6, 25B5 and 26N6G. (There may have been a few MG versions of the 6B5 and 6N6G.) In any event, their June 1937 product list shows nothing "MG" or metal in any other form.

In regard to the ill-fated 6D5, RCA designed it and did some pilot production. However, a manual scan of the 1938 Mallory-Yaxley Radio Servicing Encyclopedia shows nothing using the tube. Use of the "Radio Finder" search feature of John Okolowicz' www.grillecloth.com automatically searches it and two other data bases, and gives the same answer. However, there was one known ap­plication. The 1937 edition of the Jones Radio Handbook (Frank C. Jones, editor) shows a "metal tube 5-meter transmitter-receiver" in which the transmitter is push-pull 6D5s! "The 6D5s are similar to glass type 45s."






Tube Number Have Discription
5Q7 MG
5Z4 Cahtode Type, Full Wave Rectifier
6A8 Pentagrid-Converter (Heptode)
6C5 Triode Detector-Amplifier
6F5 Hi-Mu Triode
6F6 Pentode Power Amplifier
6H6 Double Triode
6J7 Hi-Mu Pentode Detector Amplifier
6K7 Triple Grid Variable Mu Amplifier
6N5 MG
6N6 Yes Power Output
25Z5 MG Rectifier
43 MG Power Ourput Tube
50A2 Ballest Tube
50B2 MG Ballest Tube



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Providence Journal
April 26, 1937


Providence Journal April 28, 1937


In June of 1965 we find an article in The Miami News of The Triad Tube Corporations moving into a new 15,000 square foot plant and headquarters in Sunshine State Industrial Park in North Dade. The company at that time is described as an electronics wholesaler distributing vacuum tubes for radio and television sets, selling through discount chain stores and for the industrial market. Their president Frederick M Bender said they moved from Hialeah to expand their facilities to meet the firms goal to get "at least one per cent of the annual 400 milion dollar vacuum tube replacement market." 9

On January 1st 1975, in the state of Florida the Triad Tube Corporation was setup. Its location was 71 NW 25th Street in Miami Florida. President, Director was William S Kirk, Director Susan D Kirk, Director Joseph D Weatherby. The company was involuntarily desolved in April, 25th 1978. 7


Click to see how Triad tubes were made

Radio Craft, June 1932


The Tube Industry
Radio News, October, 1929






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Triad Plant Then

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Triad Plant Now






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Joe Rines, Band Leader of the Triadors 1


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Joe Rines and His Triadors
Hello Margot!


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Joe Rines and His Triadors
Tho' You've Forgotten



In 1929 NBC stations carried The Triadors, Friday evenings at 8:00. The slogan for the show was: "There is a TRIAD tube for every radio need. "Ask for the tube on the black and yellow triangular box.".


6




Tubes & Boxes



Triad Tubes Famous Triangular Box for a T01A, 1929




T-45 Tube in Triangular Box


T-45 Tube in Triangular Box


T-45 Tube in Triangular Box


T-45 Tube in Triangular Box


T-45 Tube in Triangular Box


T-45 Tube in Triangular Box


Large and Small in Triangular Box's


Large and Small in Triangular Box's


Large and Small in Triangular Box's


T-01A


T-01A


T-01A


T-01A









Assorted Triad Tube Boxes



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Triad Advertising Clicker

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Set of 3 Triad 01A


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Triad Price List
(With NRA Logo)

,

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Triad Price List

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6N6MG Metal Jacket Tube

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Triad Tube Display
Curtesy of Joseph Knight
The Tube Collectors Association
Chairman of the Board

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Triad Type T-01A Tube



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Triad Type T-01A Tube
With Guarantee Sticker



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Triad Type T-48 Tube
With Guarantee Sticker



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Triad Type 1A6 Tube

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Triad Type 1A6 Tube

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Triad Type 1A6 Tube

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Triad K40C Ballast Tube

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Triad K40C Ballast Tube

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Triad K40C Ballast Tube

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Triad K40C Ballast Tube

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Triad Type T26 Tube

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Triad Type T26 Tube
This actual example has a FBI stamp
in the cover. Possibly used in
the investigation of counterfit tubes.

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Triad Type T2B7 Tube

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Triad Type T-34 Tube

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A later Triad Tube from Florida
no connection with Triad, other than name,
in Providence
It says it started in 1925
but Triad started in 1929.

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LIFE September 9, 1966



Ads and Articles

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Radio Retailing May 1929

Radio Doings October 19, 1929

Radio Doings September 27, 1930

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Radio, January, 1932

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Popular Science, September, 1929

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Radio Engineering, June, 1929

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Radio News, June, 1929

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Radio News, June, 1929

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Radio Broadcast, May 1929

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Radio News, October, 1929

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Radio News, November, 1929

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Radio News, May, 1929

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Radio News, January 1930

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The Grist, University of Rhode Island Yearbook, 1930

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Radio News, October, 1929

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Radio News, August, 1929

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Radio Retailing, May, 1930

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Radio News, September, 1929

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Radio Today, December, 1936

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Radio News, December, 1929

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Radio Craft, February 1933

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Radio Craft, September 1932

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Radio Craft, JUly 1932

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Radio Craft, May 1932

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Radio Craft, April 1932

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Radio Craft, April 1932

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Television News, July 1932

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Television News, September 1932

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Short Wave Craft
September 1932


Allied Catalog, 1933


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Radio Craft, April 1933


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RMA Release #13, January 1935


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The Pittsburgh Press
September 27, 1929


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QST November 1929


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QST August 1929


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QST October 1929


Radio Retailing Ads

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August, 1929

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November, 1929

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January, 1930

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May, 1930

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March, 1930

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June, 1931

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September, 1929

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February, 1930

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July, 1930

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October, 1929

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June, 1930

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April, 1930

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August, 1930

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June, 1930




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Radio Retailing
October 1938


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Radio Retailing
November 1938

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The Philadelphia Inquirer
November 17, 1929

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The Courier-Journal
March 24, 1929

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Triad Popular Science, November, 1929

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Popular Science, December, 1929

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Radio News, June, 1930

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Radio News, May, 1930

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Radio News, December,1930

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Radio News, February, 1931

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Radio News, January, 1931

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Radio News, April, 1930

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Radio Broadcast, December, 1929

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Radio News, March, 1930

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Radio News, August, 1930

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Radio News, November 1930

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Radio News, October 1930

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Radio News, September, 1930

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Radio News, March, 1930


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Radio News, February, 1937

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Radio News, November 1937


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Radio News, January, 1937


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Triad Ad, Date Unknown


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Radio News, April, 1937

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Radio News, June, 1937


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Radio News, October, 1937


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Radio News, July, 1937


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Radio News, January, 1938



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Radio News, September, 1937



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Radio News, June 1932



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Radio Broadcasting
May 1929

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Radio Engineering, September 1929


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Radio Engineering, January 1930


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Allied Catalog, 1929

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Triad Ad 1920s

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The Pittsburgh Press, August 2, 1929

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Broadcast August 1929

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Broadcast August 1929

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Democrat and Chronicle
June 26, 1930

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The Pittsburgh Press
June 30, 1929



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Detroit Free Press
June 30, 1929



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Radio Retailing
October 1929



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Radio Retailing
October 1929

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The Pittsburgh Press
September 29, 1929



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The Radio Retailing
August 1930

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Hartford Courant
March 17, 1929



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Radio Craft
October 1929

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
March 16, 1929

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The Pittsburgh Press
November 8, 1929


Triad Pens




Providence Journal
June 26, 1930


1 Boston Radio 1920-2010

2 Radio Engineering August, 1928

3 Old Timers Bulletin, Antique Wireless Association, "The Story Of CeCo and Triad Tubes"

4 Radio Engineering, January 1930

5 "The Book of Rhode Island" Distrubuted by Rhode Island State Bureau of Information in cooperation with Rhode Island Conference of Business Associations, Compilers and Publishers.

6 1929 Radio Exposition at The Boston Garden

7 TRIAD TUBE CORPORATION

8 Democrat and Chronicle June 26 1930

9 The Miami News June 14, 1965

10 EMF Electrical Year Book Volume 1, 1921