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1960 - 1969
VIN & Dataplate Decoder
1959 - 1968
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1960 - 1965
Canadian Comet/Falcon/Frontenac
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Where Is The Comet? Page 3
This page has photos of our 1961 Comet
taken in front of interesting places.

Where Is The Comet
Page 1 - Page 2 - Page 3 - Page 4 - Page 5 - Page 6 - Page 7

Where Is The Comet Diners & Dives
Page 1 - Page 2 - Page 3 - Page 4 - Page 5 - Page 6 - Page 7 - Page 8 - Page 9 - Page 10 - Page 11

RI Diners That Are gone.

Diners That Have Gone To Die.

Diners That Are On Their Way Back.
Brattle House, Newport, RI


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Brattle House, Newport, Rhode Island
Built in 1757 by Robert Brattle, the Brattle House is located in the Historic Hill's Gas Light district, in downtown Newport, Rhode Island, just one block from the waterfront. The Brattle House is now a Bead & Breakfast. One of the best around!

Pell Bridge, Newport, RI


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Pell Bridge, Newport, Rhode Island
The Claiborne Pell Bridge, commonly known as the Newport Bridge, is a suspension bridge that spans the East Passage of the Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island connecting the City of Newport on Aquidneck Island and the Town of Jamestown on Conanicut Island. The bridge is four lanes, 1601 ft long making it the longest suspension bridge in New England. Its main towers reach 400 ft above the water surface, and the roadway height reaches as high as 215 ft. The bridge was constructed from 1966-1969

Beavertail Light, Jamestown, RI


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Beavertail Light, Jamestown, Rhode Island
This rocky, windswept point looks south to the open Atlantic Ocean and separates the East and West Passages of Narragansett Bay. It has hosted beacons and lighthouses since at least 1705. The current lighthouse was built in 1856

Newport Tower, Newport, RI


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Newport Tower, Newport, Rhode Island
Perched atop a hill in Newport, Rhode Island, an old stone tower stands as one of this country's longest enduring architectural enigmas. Known by many names, including the Viking Tower, Old Stone Mill, and Mystery Tower, today this landmark is more commonly known as the Newport Tower.

Jamestown Windmill, Jamestown, RI


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Jamestown Windmill, Jamestown, Rhode Island
Built in 1787 and in operation until 1896, the old Jamestown windmill stands high on Windmill Hill in the center of the island. It is a three-story octagonal structure with a domed cap that turns into the wind. The domed cap, the bonnet, carries the wind shaft and the arms.

Clemence-Irons House, Johnston, RI


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Clemence-Irons House, Johnston, Rhode Island
Built in 1691 by Richard Clemence, Clemence-Irons House is a rare surviving example of a "stone-ender," a once common building type first developed in the western part of England. Significant as one of the oldest houses in Rhode Island

Smith-Appleby House, Smithfield, RI


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Smith-Appleby House, Smithfield, Rhode Island
Built circa 1696 by Elisha Smith, the grandson of John Smith “The Miller”, cartographer of the NE coastline and a member of Roger William’s original party of six men who left the Massachusetts Bay Colony to settle in Providence.

Fort Adams, Newport RI


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Click to enlarge picture

Fort Adams, Newport, Rhode Island
Fort Adams, The Rock on Which the Storm Will Beat. Construction of the Fort was begun in 1824 and took nearly 30 years to complete. Irish immigrant stone masons helped build it. The Fort was used by the U.S. Naval Academy during the Civil War, reverting back to the Army when the Naval Academy moved to Pelham St. in Newport. The Navy again took over the Fort in 1951. Today the Fort is a Rhode Island state park. It is home to the yearly Newport Jazz Festival, starting in 1954.